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WLADYSLAW MIRECKI

Collection of works by Wladylaw Mirecki

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Where enquiries of prices are made on the gallery, the work is subject to availability and the price to change.Holme Valley, Yorkshire 2011

Viaduct with Tank Traps – 1st prize winner Lynn Painter-Stainers 2015
Watercolour, 2014, 138 x 138 cms £15,000


Barn, Bacon’s Lane 2013
watercolour
56 x 100 cms
£4,500

Boardwalk and Boats, Tollesbury
2013
75 x 75
£4,500

Colne Valley View III
2011
50 x 150
£6,000

Coppiced Wood
2011
90 x 45
£3,250

Country Lane, Winter
2009
50 x 75
£3,000

Dead Christ with Three Angels
2008
140 x 86
£9,600

Early Autumn, Chappel Viaduct
2007
125 x 150
£15,000

East Cliff, Whitby II
2012
68.5 x 45
SOLD


Fishing Lake II
2013
52.5 x 35
SOLD


Frinton Summer
2005
50 x 75
SOLD


Hawthorn
2014
75 x 50
£3,000

Humpty Back Bridge from the Humpty Back Bridge
2014
40 x 60
£1,925

Ice Cream, Robin Hood’s Bay
2012
75.55
£3,300

Link Span, Harwich
2013
70 x 75
£4,200


Mary Jane, North Norfolk
2013
40 x 60
SOLD

Norton Hall Farm
2007
34 x 34
£925

Old Hall Farm
2013
42.5 x 100
£3,400

Ploughed Field with Viaduct
2010
54 x 75
£3,250

St Peter and St Paul, Lavenham
2013
75 x 50
£3,000

The Angler
2012
45 x 90
£3,250

The Bottom of My Garden
2004
150 x 150
£18,000

To the Beach, Walton
2013
75 x 50
£3,000

Viaduct with Poppies
2012
55 x 76
£3,350

Viaduct with Tank Traps
2015
138 x 138
£15,000


Vineyard with Hill, Ceressou, France
2012
38 x 76
£2,300

Walton Beach
Watercolour 2013
62 x 100 cms
£4,950

Walton on the Naze, Cliffs
2007
50 x 135
SOLD

Wheelie Bin, Walton
2013
80 x 100
£6,400

Wood Pile, Hoe Wood 2013 85 x 71
£4,825
 

WLADYSLAW MIRECKI

1956 Born Chelmsford, Essex of Polish parentage.
He is self-taught, having painted all his life including his periods gaining his science degree, as an industrial designer and co-proprietor of Chappel Galleries since 1986.

 
EXHIBITED
 
 
1988
New English Art Club, Mall Galleries, London
1989
Epping Forest District Museum “Artists in Essex”
1989
Beecroft Art Gallery, Westcliffe on Sea, Essex 31st Open Exhibition
1990
Chappel Galleries, Essex Solo Exhibition
1991
Foyles Art Gallery, London
1992
Department of Transport art Competition, Mall Galleries, London
Deuxieme Salon Biennale de L’Aquarelle, Hirson, France (Chelmsford 1993)
Essex County Council, Deputy Lord Lieutenant of Essex Commission
1996
Chappel Galleries, Essex10th Anniverary Exhibition: Solo Exhibition
1997
Singer and Friedlander, Sunday Times Exhibition, London
Beecroft Art Gallery, Essex: Open Exhibition
1999
Jiangsu Provincial Art Gallery, Nanjing, China: Solo Exhibition
Chappel Galleries, Essex Solo Exhibition
2002 Chappel Galleries, Essex Blyth Spirit “Walberswick Artists: 1880–2000”
2003
Chappel Galleries, Essex Solo Exhibition
WH Pattersons, London Christmas Mixed Exhibition
2004
Royal Academy, London Summer Exhibition
WH Pattersons, London Christmas Mixed Exhibition
2006
Chappel Galleries, Essex Solo Exhibition
2007
Royal Watercolour Society Open Competition, Bankside Gallery, London.
Royal Institute of Painters in Watercolours, Mall Galleries, London.
Royal Society of British Artists Annual Exhibition Mall Galleries, London: Winner of the Edward Wesson Award.
Beecroft Art Gallery, Westcliffe on Sea, Essex 49th Essex Open Exhibition: Awarded Prize and Shirley Robson Bowl for the best watercolour.
Chappel Galleries, Essex ‘Southwold, the East Coast’.
Sunday Times/Kaupthing Singer & Friedlander, London: 3rd Prize Winner, The Mall Galleries, London.
Lynn Painter-Stainers, London.
Chichester Open Art Exhibition, Chichester.
Royal West of England Academy 155th Autumn Exhibition, Bristol.
New English Art Club, The Mall Galleries, London.
2008
RWS/Sunday Times watercolour competition, Bankside Gallery, London
Lynn Painters-Stainers, London (third prize winner)
2009
Chappel Galleries, Essex Solo Exhibition
Lynn Painter-Stainers, London
2010
Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 198 Annual Exhibition, London
Eastern Open, King’s Lynn Arts Centre
Sunday Times Watercolour Competition 23rd Year (2nd Prize Winner), Mall Galleries, London
Duncan Campbell Fine Art, London: Solo Exhibition
2011
Work on loan for opening of new branch of Handelsbanken, Colchester
Sunday Times Watercolour Competition in association with Smith and Williamson: The Mall Galleries, London  
Discerning Eye Exhibition: The Mall Galleries, London 10-20 November
2012
Piers Feetham Gallery, London: Solo Exhibition
Lynn Painter Stainers Exhibition, London
Chappel Galleries, Essex: Solo Exhibition
Norwich Castle Open Art Show
2013
Chelmsford Borough Museum: Two Man Exhibition with Paul Rumsey, 9th February to 21st April.
2013
Studio Eleven, Westcliff on Sea, Essex: ‘Kiss the Joy’ mixed exhibition.
2013
Royal Society of British Artists, Annual Exhibition: The Mall Galleries, London.
2014
March 1st-30th ‘…just as it is…’ Chappel Galleries, Essex: Solo Exhibition.
September Sunday Times/ Smith Williamson Watercolour Competition: The Mall Galleries, London and touring
2015
Lyn Painter-Stainers: The Mall Galleries, London 16th to 21st Febuary 1st prize winner.
Piers Feetham Gallery, London: Solo Exhibition 19th March to 11th April.
 
 
COLLECTIONS
 
 
1989
Essex County Council
1999
Jiangsu Province Art Museum, People’s Republic of China
Jiangsu Province Department of Culture, People’s Republic of China
2000, 09
Chelmsford Museums, Essex
2000
Ipswich Borough Council Museums & Galleries, Suffolk
2012
Colchester and Ipswich Museums (on behalf of Colchester Borough Council)
 
 
PUBLICATIONS
 
 
2000
February Edition, Jiangsu Art Monthly
April Edition, Artists & Illustrators Magazine
2003
A Walk in the Country – 32pp Monograph
2006
“Southwold: An Earthly Paradise” by Geoffrey Munn.
Wladyslaw Mirecki at Fifty – 32pp Monograph.
BBC Television Programme: ‘Seven Man-made Wonders of the East’ interview about Chappel Viaduct, showing Mirecki’s paintings depicting the Viaduct.
2009
‘On My Doorstep’: Introduction by Laura Gascoigne published by Chappel Galleries, Essex.
The Spectator “Winter Fine Arts” by Andrew Lambirth November issue.
Jackdaw Magazine “Easel Words” May/June issue.
The Artist Magazine, “Masterclass” November issue.
Pratique des Arts magazine France, December issue.
2010
Duncan Campbell exhibition brochure: Introduction by Andrew Lambirth, art critic of The Spectator.
2012
Jackdaw Magazine page 36: News 'That Beckam Tattoo'
'Closely Observed' Landscape - East Anglia and Beyond: Introduction by Andrew Wilton published by Piers Feetham Gallery, London.
Lynn Painter Stainers catalogue page 11 ‘Holme Valley, Yorkshire’.
‘Around and About: Introduction by David Lee editor of ‘Jackdaw’ published Chappel Galleries, Essex.
2014
March 1st-30th ‘…just as it is…’ Introduction by Mark Curteis, Curator Chelmsford Museum, published by Chappel Galleries, Essex.
2015
‘New Landscape Watercolours’ Introduction by Andrew Lambirth, published by Piers Feetham Gallery

I first encountered Mirecki’s work through a professional happenstance – as the newly appointed Curator of Social History and Art at Chelmsford Museum I was exploring the art in the collections and I was struck by two watercolours - Dooley’s Field and The Parapet, Chappel Viaduct 1998 both by Wladyslaw Mirecki. My attention was drawn by the subject matter as, although I work in Chelmsford, I live on the Essex/Suffolk border and the viaduct is a prominent local landmark. I was then struck by the feel of the work, attention to detail and his honest representation of his subject matter. Wladyslaw (or Waj to those who know him) really captures the essence and sense of place in his work - both things that I think are essential in landscape painting.

In 2013 the museum put on a major temporary exhibition of Mirecki’s work, titled Light and Dark, it juxtaposed Mirecki’s work showing light and life with more dark and gothic themes by Paul Rumsey. The exhibition enabled me to get to know Waj, see more of his work, and get an insight into the meaning and thought processes that produced the work.

It is clear that the East Anglian landscape greatly inspires him and it is present in his new exhibition in all its forms, beaches at sunset with the setting sun reflected on the foreshore (‘Lone Walker, Sunset’), desolate estuaries, woodland glades, lakes and verdant fields.

He works exclusively in water colour with a detailed technique. Self-taught, Waj makes his own rules, which is perhaps why there is so much vitality and honesty in his work. He enjoys the uneasy alliance between the natural and the man-made: a tarmac road junction turned into a beautiful composition with the sun dappled grey on tarmac in the foreground against the lush blues, greens and purples behind (‘Loveneys’). Only Waj would put in the patched tarmac: perfectly capturing present day reality for future generations as it is, because its there, but still making it beautiful. There is often obvious humour, for example, a gas holder to counterpoint the picture postcard perfection of Lavenham (‘Gas Holder, Lavenham’) or a well executed stairwell and landing representing the historic timber framed Little Hall (‘Stairwell, Little Hall Museum, Lavenham’). Indeed, the insistence of the banal and the modern as unavoidable intruders into our appreciation of nature is a hallmark of his work.

Waj deliberately uses bold elements in some of his paintings which sometimes appear not to conform to conventional principles of composition. The result initially feels uneasy to the viewer. Then you stop and look. For example, he will put a barbed wire fence in ‘Fishing Lake’ while in ‘Hogweed and willow herb’, the hogweed stands alone, forlorn, before the lush vegetation and colour of the willow herb. The hogweed initially looks out of place, not allowing the work to have that ‘picture perfect’ sense. He obviously wants to draw the viewer in by arresting their attention to what at first glance is a beautifully rendered image that somehow doesn’t seem quite right – then as the viewer stops he is drawn in to the detail, the composition, the subject matter – which reveals itself almost layer by layer. It is almost impossible to walk past one of his paintings – the viewer is compelled to stop and see what he has done and only then will the picture begin to reveal its secrets and make sense until finally, on the hogweed, you observe the small hover fly on the flower.

In water colours like ‘Link Span, Harwich Pier’ and ‘Walberswick Pier and moon’ one appreciates the subtlety of Mirecki's work; and one can almost smell and feel the sea through gently breaking waves or gentle rivulets of water on the mud flats at low tide. The seascapes, estuarine mud flats and grasses take on the warm light hues of a summer sunset or moonlit night. Mirecki captures their atmospheres beautifully, imbuing such works with a sense of peace, and inviting reflection.

Waj’s use of light is masterful. From a bright spring morning, to dusk on an estuary, you can feel the day he has painted – you know exactly the temperature, the feel of the wind, the colour of the sky. You don’t just look at his paintings – you experience them.

There are several views capturing the beauty and tranquility of Chalkney Woods, particularly known for its wood anemones, local to the Mireckis and (along with the viaduct) a common theme for inspiration in his work.  In ‘Skirting the Puddle’ we see Edna (Waj’s wife and co-proprietor of the Chappel Galleries) on a bleak winter’s afternoon walking down a muddy woodland track. Here one can almost imagine being there, the smell of mud and damp decaying leaves….thinking of being home by a warm fire. The reflections in the puddle show the artist’s skill of accurate portrayal, the reflections of trees and sky perfectly rendered on the mirror surface.

Of course, no exhibition would be complete without Mirecki's beloved viaduct rising from the earth; a masterly feat of engineering and design. Surrounded by trees, lush foliage and grasses the painting eloquently expresses nature's relationship with the manmade. When it works, as it does here, it really works.

This exhibition represents the sort of quality painting one might expect from Waj. More importantly it captures and celebrates our superb English (East Anglian) countryside. Enjoy!

Dr Mark Curteis January 2014
Curator of Social History and Art, Chelmsford Museum

 

Much of Mirecki’s potency of image derives from the juxtaposition of man-made architecture and natural growth: a typical subject might be the River Colne in Spate. The picture’s foreground is thronged with foliage expertly painted (though thankfully not with quite the mad hallucinatory extremism of the Pre-Raphaelites), the central episode features light reflected off moving water, while trees take us into the background and the Chappel Viaduct. The accuracy is not snapshot photographic, it is a skilled recreation of a specific place at a particular time of day and season. The painting is an interpretation of a familiar landscape, an investigation into its rhythms and structures, the underlying forms which give it presence and meaning. Mirecki departs from the literal truth when it is necessary for the painting to do so, carefully heightening or moderating it. The artist’s principal work lies in making decisions about what to include and what to disregard, where to place an emphasis and where to put a counter-balance. Mirecki’s artistic transformation of his subject is so subtle and sophisticated that sometimes it goes almost unnoticed.

The coast has become another favoured subject, usually East Anglian, such as the beguilingly austere View from Clacton Pier, with its skeletal forms of wind turbines fading into the cloud-bank on the horizon. Occasionally there is no vestige of man’s impact on the environment. It is eye-opening to see a straightforward study of sea, sky and land, as put forward with luminous yet understated brilliance in West Cliff, Whitby II. Other landscapes include a vineyard in the south of France, and a couple of views of Salisbury. Mirecki strays in Constable’s footsteps over the water-meadows, places the cathedral’s spire at the top of his painting, but brings the focus in low, to the reed-fringed drainage system. This oddly serene image wakens echoes of John Nash’s painting The Moat, Grange Farm, Kimble (1922) in the Tate. Mirecki’s other Salisbury subject is a witty urban scene: the elegant spire caught this time between two red-brick council houses, and put in its place by satellite dish and double yellow lines.

As Clive James wrote recently: ‘The only way to hide the tensions of a set form is to perfect it.’ He was referring to poetry, but the same can be said of painting: only when the conflicting tensions of a landscape are resolved, can a harmonious painting result. In these beautiful new paintings, Wladyslaw Mirecki shows us how a vision of landscape may be perfected.

Andrew Lambirth 2015

 

 

 
 

 

 
 
 
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